Greater Lehigh Valley

Writers Group


3650 Nazareth Pike, PMB #136
  Bethlehem, PA 18020-1115 
 
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Monthly Programs

Monthly Meetings

GLVWG meets from September through June on the 4th Saturday of the month at the Palmer Library, Palmer Township. Note: no monthly meetings are held in December, July, or August. We typically skip either March or April due to the conference—check the calendar on the home page for details. Click here for upcoming programs.

Our Schedule

9:45 a.m. Join us for refreshments

10–10:40 GLVWG business meeting

Open to all members; prospective members are invited to attend up to three times. We introduce new members/guests and what they write; encourage members to share publishing news/writing triumphs; announce upcoming events; gather member opinions about how best to use organizational funds to serve their needs; and let people know about volunteer opportunities within GLVWG and other ways to promote networking with other writers. The participation of all members is highly valued--otherwise, you are leaving important decisions up to others!

10:40 Spotlight or Tech Talk

A member presents either a Spotlight (a reading of original work) or a Tech Talk (tips on writing craft for fellow writers). To volunteer, contact any Member Representative.

10:50 Refreshments

11:00 Program: A guest speaker—a published author or other publishing industry professional—focuses on some aspect of the craft of writing or the business of publishing.

On dates where an afternoon workshop is scheduled, don’t run off! Those staying through often lunch together. An announcement to this effect will be made.  

Afternoon Workshops are no charge to members, 
BUT YOU MUST STILL REGISTER HERE.  

Non members are $15.00 Register HERE.


Morning Programs
11 am-12 noon Following Monthly Meeting
No registration or fee for the morning programs


Morning workshop Saturday May 25th, 2013.  

Blockbuster YA (Young Adult) panel discussion, 
Panel discussion goes till 1:00PM.

Our phenomenal panel of published YA authors will answer all your questions about this up and coming genre for readers of all ages:

Jennifer R. Hubbard
www.jenniferhubbard.com
I prefer to write short fiction and young-adult novels. I had my first short story published when I was seventeen, but it took me many years to write well with consistency, and I continue to learn more every year. My short fiction has appeared in literary magazines such as Willow Review and North American Review, and a short story called “Confessions and Chocolate Brains” appears in the 2011 anthology Truth & Dare. My contemporary young-adult novels are The Secret Year (2010) and Try Not to Breathe (2012).

Alissa Grosso
www.alissagrosso.com
Alissa is the author of the novels Popular (Flux, 2011) and Ferocity Summer (Flux, 2012). Her third novel Shallow Pond is due out from Flux in July. She grew up in New Jersey and graduated magna cum laude from Rutgers with a B.A. in English. These days she lives in a small town in Pennsylvania, but she can walk to New Jersey (There’s a bridge.)

When she isn’t working on a new novel, she might be busy with a freelance writing project or sharing her love of all things vintage in her Etsy shop Planet Alissa. In the past she has worked as a newspaper editor, a children’s librarian and a long, long time ago as a tavern wench complete with Colonial style costume. 

Alissa is a member of  The Class of 2K11, The KidLit Authors ClubThe Elevensies and The Society of Children’s Book Writers and Illustrators (SCBWI)


Nicole Zoltack
www.NicoleZoltack.com
Nicole has always been fascinated with the Middle Ages and the Renaissance. She devoured books about chivalry and knight, love and romance, she even had a Renaissance themed wedding.  Throughout her research, she wondered if there were any female knights, knowing how women were treated back then. To her surprise, she uncovered information about an entire order of female knights - the Order of the Hatchet in Catalonia. These brave women protected their town of Tortosa from Moor attack. Along with their new status, the women were exempted from taxes and preceded over men in public assemblies.  This inspired her to write about a young girl who wishes to become a knight, citing these brave women.  

Her debut novel - Woman of Honor (2009) is the first in the Kingdom of Arnhem series, the story of the young would-be female knight. Book II - Knight of Glory further explores the medieval fantasy land of Arnhem.  Champion of Valor  is the third book in the series.

John Evans
www.johnevanswriter.com/
Our own John Evans is a published author with a special interest in Mark Twain. In 1993, University Press of America published his first book, A Tom Sawyer Companion, which draws a parallel between The Adventures of Tom Sawyer and Twain’s personal adventures as a boy. He has also written personal essays and articles. “Getting the Bugs out of Tom Sawyer”, a humorous look at an entomologist obsessed with insects mentioned by Twain, was published in McGraw Hill’s 2000 edition of Tom Sawyer. He has also reviewed books for the Mark Twain Forum, an on-line website consisting primarily of Twain scholars who share an interest in Twain’s life and writing. 

In 2006, John retired from teaching and has turned his energies to writing fiction. In 2003, his first novel The Cut was published by Beachhouse Books to favorable reviews. He has just completed writing a second novel, A Dead Issue, which will be released by Sunbury Press in the spring of 2013. John has been an active member of the Greater Lehigh Valley Writers Group since 1994 and has served on the board as Member Representative (2003-2006), vice president (2006-2007), president (2007-2008), and Author Advocacy Chair (2008-2013). He lives in Pennsylvania with his wife, daughter, and the obligatory cat and dog.


Morning workshop Saturday June22nd, 2013

Focus the Moment in Your Writing

During the morning session, Poet Marilyn Hazelton will describe a technique called “link and shift”, a central concept in Japanese poetic forms.  

She will present an overview of these forms as they developed over 1,300 years to the present day.  The forms include tanka (a 5-phrase poem), haiku (a 3 phrase poem), haibun (poem + reflective prose), and haiga (poem + art).  

Marilyn will touch on how the Japanese forms develop the ability to discover vivid detail that can illuminate all genres of prose, as well as poetry.

 will describe a technique called “link and shift”, a central concept in Japanese poetic forms.  She will present an overview of these forms as they developed over 1,300 years to the present day.  The forms include tanka (a 5-phrase poem), haiku (a 3 phrase poem), haibun (poem + reflective prose), and haiga (poem + art).  Marilyn will touch on how the Japanese forms develop the ability to discover vivid detail that can illuminate all genres of prose, as well as poetry.

Marilyn Hazelton is a teaching artist with the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts.  Her work includes residencies in France, Japan and Morocco. A regular presenter at Haiku Society of America meetings in Manhattan, she is Poet-in-Residence at The Swain School in Allentown. She received an Arts Ovation Award from the Allentown Arts Commission in 2006, in the category of Literary Arts. Her writing has been published in a number of journals and venues.  Marilyn edits red lights, an international tanka journal.

 
 
 

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